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A man walks through the rubble in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian in the Great Abaco island town of Marsh Harbour on September 2, 2019. (Photo: PBS)

The Bahamas recovering following devastation of Hurricane Dorian

A man walks through the rubble in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian in the Great Abaco island town of Marsh Harbour on September 2, 2019. (Photo: PBS)

The affected islands of The Bahamas are slowly rebounding with the return of tourists and heightened recovery efforts following the passage of Hurricane Dorian a month ago.

Many of the hotels and attractions on Grand Bahama Island have reopened, with more expected to follow shortly, since the island was battered by the Category 5 system on September 1.

An aerial view of Grand Bahama island, where cars and houses were submerged in water, following the passage of Hurricane Dorian last month. (Photo: Yahoo News)

Additionally, the local airport is expected to resume international service by mid-November, according to the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism and Aviation. Currently, only domestic flights are operating with the use of temporary facilities.

However, much of The Abacos remains devastated, “with virtually no viable options for leisure tourism in the near future”, the Ministry said in a recent release. It added that the islands’ “current focus is on re-opening local government complexes and restoring basic services to facilitate rebuilding.”

An aerial view of Abaco Island following the passage of Hurricane Dorian.
(Photo: Yahoo News)

“While The Abacos face a longer road to recovery, the country remains resilient and steadfast in its commitment to help the island rebuild by maintaining a healthy flow of tourism — which accounts for half of the country’s GDP — to the islands that were not affected by the storm.”

The ministry emphasised that Nassau and Paradise Islands were unaffected by the hurricane — a relief given they account for the country’s most extensive array of resorts, hotels, restaurants, and tour operators. Nassau is also the central hub of the recovery efforts by the country’s Government, which currently provides lodging to 895 displaced people in six shelters.

More than 60 people were killed and almost 300 remain missing after the hurricane, which stalled over the island for an entire day, caused billions of dollars in losses.