CBR
search

New duty resolution in Anguilla prohibits sale of exempted villa furnishings

A new motion laid by Parliament in Anguilla’s House of Assembly, offers up to a 25 per cent duty concession on beds and other materials which can be used to furnish villas.

 However, the goods cannot be sold within five years of using this government concession. Heavy penalties are attached if furnishings are disposed of in contravention to the resolution.

An Anguillan villa. Photo: wheretostay.com

Statutory Instruments of Anguilla No. 201  made  by  the  House  of  Assembly  under  section  77  (1)  of  the  Customs  Act,    on September 3, says   the  House   exempts  from  duty  the  goods  imported  into  Anguilla  specified in the Schedule – which is an extensive list of furnishings and equipment for villas.

However, the resolution says such goods shall not, within five years of the date of importation, be sold, exchanged, given away or applied to any use other than the use specified.

A well-appointed villa. (Photo: wheretostay.com)

Further, on the expiry of six months from the date of importation and each successive six-month period within the 5-year period after the date of importation, the importer shall certify   to the Comptroller of Customs that he has complied with the conditions set out.

The resolution says that upon demand made by a customs officer, the goods exempted from duty shall be produced or otherwise accounted for to the customs officer.

The resolution states that if  any of the goods exempted from duty under this resolution are sold, exchanged,  given away or applied to any use other than the use specified in the Schedule within the five year  date of importation  the importer shall pay the duty on the  value of such goods at the rate of duty   specified in the Integrated Customs Tariff at the date of importation.

Anguilla’s local currency is the Eastern Caribbean dollar, which is fixed to the U.S. dollar. (Photo: wheretostay.com)

The resolution states that the importer   and   any   person   knowingly   concerned   in   such   sale,    exchange,  gift  or  unsanctioned  use  is  guilty  of  an  offence  and  may  be   arrested   and  is  liable  to  a  fine  of  EC $20,000  or  three   times  the  duty  relieved, whichever  is  the  greater,  or  to imprisonment  for  a  term  of  two  years  or  to both.

Anguilla’s local currency is the Eastern Caribbean dollar, which is fixed to the U.S. dollar at $2.72(EC) to $1(USD).

The resolution also states that the goods in respect of which the exemption was granted are liable to forfeiture as well, if the law is contravened.

Penalties are also attached if the importer fails to certify that he has not sold, exchanged, given away or applied the goods to any use other than the use specified in the Schedule.